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Learning Center

Here District staff members provide timely and useful information to you in a format that will allow you to quickly learn how every step you take to reduce, reuse and recycle DOES matter. The best way to stay connected and ensure you receive updates and reminders from us is to sign up for our e-newsletter; just complete the form at the bottom of our homepage.

Careful Car Care

Posted by on Aug 6, 2017 in Learning Center

Love of the automobile is an American tradition. Do-it-yourself (DIY) projects are also a very American concept.  Millions of us do standard vehicle maintenance, including oil changes, in our own garages, barns and driveways. It’s a great way to save some cash, connect with your ride and get your hands dirty! But, it is vitally important that automotive fluids such as motor oil, transmission fluid, antifreeze and brake fluid are disposed of properly. Automotive fluids that are dumped down the drain, put in the trash or are poured on the ground can do significant environmental damage. If improperly disposed of, the amount of oil in one standard oil change can contaminate one million gallons of fresh water. Every year, in the U.S., 180 million gallons of used motor oil is dumped on the ground, down sewers and into landfills by DIYers. That is 16 times the amount lost in the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989! The good news? There are many local outlets to properly recycle these types of materials. Most automotive fluids can be re-refined and used again and again—including motor oil, antifreeze and transmission fluid.    When changing your own oil or working with another automotive fluid, carefully collect the unwanted solution in a sturdy container with a cap. Do not combine different chemicals in the same container. Used motor oil can be recycled locally at most auto service providers and auto parts stores—some local examples include Brownsburg Muffler and Service, Auto Zone, Indy Lube, Walmart, Mel’s Service Center and Indy Tire Center (full list). Some of these same places will also accept used oil filters, brake fluid, antifreeze and other fluids for recycling. Some limits may apply, so call ahead for program details and limitations. ...

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A ReStore Reminder

Posted by on Jul 7, 2017 in Adult Outreach, General, Learning Center, Recycling

Whenever you are cleaning and clearing out, consider donating items that otherwise might be thrown away, to the Habitat for Humanity ReStore. And, as you embark on those DIY projects, don’t forget to shop the ReStore for the supplies and materials you need.  The Habitat for Humanity ReStore, located at 1099 N. State Road 267, is a great reuse resource. You can save some money, support a great organization and keep waste from the landfill. Items accepted for donation (must be in good/usable condition) include: • Latex Paint (reusable, nearly full containers, less than one-year-old) • Furniture (no rips, stains or smells) • Flooring • Flat Panel TVs • Appliances • Lawn Mowers • Gas Grills • Cabinets • Tools • Sinks • Vanities • Lighting • Building Materials • Toilets • Windows • Doors • Counter Tops • HVAC Components • Books Not only can you donate and shop at the ReStore, but they will also pick up large donations at your location.  Call 317-707-7530 to coordinate a donation pick-up.  Visit their website or find them on Facebook for more information....

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What To Do With Latex Paint

Posted by on Jun 20, 2017 in Learning Center

Unwanted or unusable latex paint seems to be everywhere. Many of us inherit a less-than-desirable collection of it when we buy a house; leftovers from the previous owners. The good news is latex paint is non-toxic and doesn’t require any special disposal (so please don’t bring it to Tox-Away Day…doing so slows down the line & increases the District’s cost to provide the events…). Once it’s been dried out, local trash haulers will pick it up with your normal household trash. But, there is a better way! Avoiding the need to dispose of that paint is a much better option. So, here are some quick tips to help you do just that. BUY IT RIGHT–the best way to avoid having leftover paint you don’t want is to buy the correct amount to begin with. Consult an online paint calculator or ask the representative at the paint counter for help figuring what you’ll need. STORE IT RIGHT–extreme temperatures will ruin paint! If possible, store paint in an interior closet. Be sure the lids are on tightly. You can even store the cans upside down and allow the paint itself to form an airtight seal against the lid. USE IT UP–before throwing paint away you no longer want, consider giving it another life. Maybe a neighbor or non-profit can use it (Habitat ReStore in Avon will accept usable latex paint in full or nearly full containers. They also sell a line of recycled paint–it’s good stuff at a very good price!). Or, perhaps it would make a perfect primer for your next painting project. If you must throw some paint away, simply add sand or clay-based cat litter to the paint until there are equal parts of absorbent and paint. Stir until well mixed. Place the uncovered container in a well-ventilated area until the mixture hardens. Then dispose of the uncovered container with your regular trash (leaving the containers uncovered lets your trash hauler know that the paint has been hardened).  TIP:  when drying paint from a container that is more than half full, line a sturdy cardboard box with a garbage bag. Alternate between pouring absorbent and paint into the lined box until the paint container is empty. Stir until mixed and let it harden. Click to watch our Latex Paint Drying Video Demonstration (yes, it is as exciting as it sounds…) Oil-based paints, stains, varnishes, lacquers, etc. should be disposed of at a Tox-Away Day. We accept these (and many other materials) free-of-charge at the...

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Yard Waste Recycling Centers are Open!

Posted by on Jun 20, 2017 in Learning Center

It’s hard to believe that materials that are so rich in organic matter and micronutrients could ever be called “waste”. But, we understand that not everyone has the time, space or inclination to compost. If you are looking to clear things like weeds, tree trimmings, plant materials, grass clippings and leaves from your yard, we have a place for you to recycle them. The District operates two Yard Waste Recycling Centers for your convenience in Brownsburg and Plainfield. The sites are open from April through November and are to be used by Hendricks County residents to recycle yard waste from their households. Businesses are not to use these facilities for material they may generate through their operations. Only organic material is accepted at these facilities. Tree stumps, sod, soil, building materials and plastic bags cannot be deposited at the Yard Waste Recycling Centers. Firewood may be left at the Centers free-of-charge for others to pick up to use. The material collected at the Centers is ultimately processed into mulch. Customers are responsible for unloading all materials. Wood chips are usually available for free pick-up at the Brownsburg Yard Waste Recycling Center. Residents are urged to call ahead to confirm availability and are responsible for loading and hauling the wood chips. Hours & Locations: Brownsburg Yard Waste Recycling Center 90 Mardale Drive Open 7am to 5pm on Tues., Fri. & Sat. Phone:  317-858-8231 Plainfield Yard Waste Recycling Center 7020 S. County Road 875 E. Open 7am to 5pm on Mon., Fri. & Sat. Phone:  317-838-9332 GreenCycle McCarty in Danville also accepts organic waste (including soil and sod) at the company’s facility in Danville and are another great, local resource for managing yard...

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